Common Core Conversation

Year started: 2012
Audience(s): K - 12 educators and administrators
Who Started It: Kristina Holzweiss
# Members: 800
Email
The Common Core Conversation is a nationwide group on Edmodo (code gy48aa). This community uses a social media learning environment that connects teachers to collaborate and share resources about addressing the Common Core Standards in the classroom.
Share
Added on May 4, 2012
Vote Up!   6 votes
Loading...

11 Responses to Common Core Conversation

  1. Hilda McKee says:

    Currently, our district is developing a curriculum based on the common core standards for all levels. I have participated on developing plans for high school English.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  2. John Parker says:

    I am a retired high school mathematics teacher (18 yrs.) and school district administrator (16 yrs) who is working with teachers on developing units that use basic elements of Understanding by Design (Wiggins & McTighe) and Teaching for Understanding (Wiske, et. al. Harvard Graduate Sch. of Ed.) and links these to Common Core Standards. I call this unit planning process BigIdeas4TheCommonCore. It is my opinion that we need to recapture teachers’ collective interest in developing their content knowledge beyond undergraduate and graduate courses. Over the past two decades, behaviorist learning theory as a means to achieve high standardized test scores has dominated instruction and has trivialized teaching and learning. The transition to the CC offers an opportunity to get beyond this digression.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Hilda McKee says:

      I am not sure how your district is developing your English units but ours in combining much of our literature readings with the Social Studies from 9th and 10th grades.

      Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

      • John Parker says:

        Integrating curriculum is much more efficient and productive when planning begins with “big ideas” versus typical curriculum objectives. All of the math units that I have helped plan include texts for seminars related to overarching “big ideas.” e.g. In a development of trig ratios geometry unit, we used, “All measures are approximations,” as an overarching big idea and used a selection from Stephen Jay Gould’s, “Mismeasure of Man” as a lead-in seminar text. Also, as one of three writing prompts for journal entry, used, “What do statisticians mean when they use the phrase, ‘triangulate the data?’ ” Another opportunity presented by transition to CCSS.

        Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

        • Hilda McKee says:

          The integration of the two core areas covers the big ideas from Social Studies. This probably occurred because the goal of our planners is to boost test scores. Hopefully, seeing content material twice will help our students understand it better.

          Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

    • Christie Toland says:

      Understanding by Design has been a driving force in unit development for my building as well. I would love to hear more about your BigIdeas4theCommonCore program. We have an Administrator CCSS Resource group as well in Edmodo (y0a71a) if you would like to join and share your ideas with other administrators. We are nervous but extremely excited about this transition that supports a focus on student learning and college and career readiness rather than simply the almighty test score.

      Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  3. Barb Hankins says:

    We also have created Humanities instead of LA\SS at the middle school level. The PLC took the English standards and created a grid then overlayed social studies. At the high school it is separate.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  4. Barb Hankins says:

    We also have created Humanities instead of LA\SS at the middle school level. The PLC took the English standards and created a grid then overlayed social studies. At the high school they are separate subjects.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  5. Deb Brady says:

    We just spent the last two weeks working on CC curriculum and on train-the-trainer courses in ELA and Literacy across the Disciplines and Math. We divided ELA and Literacy into Elementary and Secondary sections and divided math into Elementary, Middle, and HS. We’ve spent the last year in CC committees studying the core and figuring out what we needed to do as a district.

    We’ve bought new textbooks for math K-5 and 6-8, and the HS is developing its own textbook/course using Integrated Math Modeling.

    In ELA and Literacy, we started with writing across the disciplines led by teachers from the National Writing Project. The teachers loved the courses that looked at Writing to Learn and Genre Studies.

    There is so much to do, and we’re trying to take it slowly “to go fast” as Denny(?) says.
    Next year, every teacher, team, grade-level, or department has to create and implement one unit that aligns with the Common Core, then assess what our next steps should be for next summer’s PD. Our school committee allowed us more early release days (about 2 a month) so that we could do this work.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  6. John Parker says:

    I have just received and read through the new Mathematical Modeling Handbook, published by COMAP (the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications, http://www.comap.com). It provides a variety of modules correlated to CCSS that provide rich opportunities for creating units that directly address the Modeling Standard for Mathematical Practice, while embedding other content areas from CCSS. As a UBD enterprise, teachers can use modules like these to develop “big idea” problems that are loaded with opportunities for scaffolding more discrete skills and CCSS content standards. The challenge is in transitioning teacher thinking from repeated use of direct skill mastery to embedding use of skills in more engaging problem solving contexts like these. Sample units that apply this theory can be a catalyst for helping in this transition.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

  7. Please visit our sister site, a work in progress at http://www.commoncoreconversation.com/.

    Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

What do you like about this community?

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

thirteen + ten =